Advancing the Feminist Cause but at What/Whose Cost?

GirlThe Brazil National High School Exam (ENEM) recently made headlines for its inclusion of several controversial questions. The nationally administered exam included two questions that asked students to take a stance on women’s’ rights in Brazil. Two of the multiple choice questions included excerpts from prominent feminist scholars while the essay’s theme was the prevalence of violence against women in Brazilian society. After the test was administered, the questions caused national debate. Students and politicians alike used social media to express feelings of disdain and support.

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Women’s Media, Only the Starting Point

In recent years, female students start to take advantage of the technology era and make great efforts to create online platforms for women’s voice. Amani Al-Khatahtbeh, a young Muslim student, launched MuslimGirl.net, which challenges stereotypes of Muslim women. Another group of Harvard students is even more high-profile by designing an online magazine website, Her Campus, exclusively for domestic and international female students.qOdDBN1

Her Campus has more than 300 chapters, each called “My Campus,” at universities in the United States and across the globe, including Finland, Japan, Australia, United Kingdom and Puerto Rico. Continue reading

For Them, Education Is Literally the Best Way out

When students mock how schools resemble prisons, schools in prisons are in fact cherished by inmates, especially female prisoners. Recently, three news articles bring up the issue of education in female prisons. In California, female prisoners are trained with computer skills and they obtain certificates after graduation. In Tennessee, women involve in adult education programs where they earn diplomas equivalent to high school degrees. And in Montana, The Department of Corrections is considering adding computer programming classes to state prison education programs to improve inmates’ chances of getting jobs when they finish their sentences. Continue reading

Vloggers: Redefining Education in the Information Age?

Vlogging– video blogging

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Saima Chowdury discusses her experience of university life as a Muslim woman. Click to view video.

Around the world people are increasingly utilizing the internet on a daily basis as a source and channel of information. As a result, many individuals’ voices are heard in ways that were not possible in the past. They are using technology to reach audiences in new and revolutionary ways, becoming “teachers” in their own areas of interest. In many ways these voices influence global education through the formation and introduction of new types of discourse and new ideas about what education can look like. One such individual who has found her voice in this way is Saima Chowdhury, a young Muslim fashion vlogger (video blogger) who has gained the attention of teens and young women across the UK.

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Sticking it to the Man!: Promoting Women’s Entrepreneurship in the Caribbean

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This past week, 144 countries across the world hosted events celebrating the United Nations’ Women’s Entrepreneurship Week (WEW). Women’s Entrepreneurship Week was a week long international effort to raise awareness on issues affecting women internationally and encourage women’s entrepreneurship around the world. Some of the organized activities included celebrating the accomplishments of successful women entrepreneurs, discussing global women’s issues and educating aspiring women entrepreneurs.

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Beyond Letting Girls Learn

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Earlier this week the Atlantic featured an article by first lady Michelle Obama calling out to the world to make a stand for girls’ education. In her article she acknowledges how crucial financial investments are to expanding the opportunities available to girls around the world. As part of the Obama Administration’s Let Girls Learn campaign, Michelle Obama plans to tour the Middle East stressing the importance of investments in women’s education. However, Obama is also using her high-profile to promote girls’ education by engaging with people to look beyond schools for change and to challenge and overrule the laws and practices that perpetuate gender discrimination and oppression.

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