COP21: Include African Women

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Edna Kaptoyo and Priscilla Achakpa discuss the importance of African women’s voices at COP21. See full video here.

In the video above, Priscilla Achakpa of Nigeria and Edna Kaptoyo of Kenya discuss the importance of African women’s involvement in the Paris Climate Change Conference given the disproportionate effect that climate change has on women in developing countries. Achakpa and Kaptoyo explain that in rural communities, women are the main source of labor in a family. This means that the woman is responsible for collecting water and firewood for the household, along with completing other agricultural and household tasks. When lakes dry up as a result of climate change, it is women who are expected to walk to the extra distance to the next available water source. This can prove to be a dangerous and grueling task.

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The Ultra Rich and Education

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and wife Priscilla Chan with their daughter, Max.

This week Mark Zuckerberg and Priscilla Chan, his wife, announced that they would be donating a large percentage of their fortune to charity over the course of their lifetimes- roughly 99% of their Facebook shares or about $45 billion. This announcement came in the days leading up to the birth of their first child and was delivered as an open letter to their daughter. They framed their announcement as part of their vision for the better world they hoped for for her in her lifetime and to many this was heralded as a generous and selfless decision. And maybe it was to a certain extent. But by putting their money into an LLC, which is what Zuckerberg and Chan have announced they are going to do, they will avoid paying a large sum of taxes on their enormous fortune. So what might the real effect of their decision be, and in particular what could it mean for the state of education in the United States?

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Vloggers: Redefining Education in the Information Age?

Vlogging– video blogging

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Saima Chowdury discusses her experience of university life as a Muslim woman. Click to view video.

Around the world people are increasingly utilizing the internet on a daily basis as a source and channel of information. As a result, many individuals’ voices are heard in ways that were not possible in the past. They are using technology to reach audiences in new and revolutionary ways, becoming “teachers” in their own areas of interest. In many ways these voices influence global education through the formation and introduction of new types of discourse and new ideas about what education can look like. One such individual who has found her voice in this way is Saima Chowdhury, a young Muslim fashion vlogger (video blogger) who has gained the attention of teens and young women across the UK.

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“Oh! The Places You’ll Go!”: A Critical Look at the Growing Demand for Study Abroad

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On October 1, 2015, University World News reported that the number of students studying abroad from the United States will increase by at least 77,000 students annually over the next five years as a result of the support provided to the Institute of International Education’s (IIE) Generation Study Abroad Initiative. By 2020, IIE hopes this number will increase to 600,000 students studying abroad each year.

As the number of students studying abroad increases, the institutions facilitating these programs must also increase their awareness of what effect study abroad programs may have, what potential exists for improvement of this growing educational option, and start asking harder questions about the experience, such as for whom this opportunity is really open. Particularly in an increasingly globalized world where the skills gained from studying abroad are increasingly marketable, is the study abroad experience becoming a status symbol contributing to the growing wealth distribution gap?

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